Costa Rica Naranjo

Costa Rica Naranjo

Country: Costa Rica
Region: Naranjo, in the West Valley region
Altitude: 3,900-4,400ft
Varietal: Caturra, Catuai, Bourbon
Process: Wet processed, Sun-dried
$13.00 (12 oz can)
$75.00 (5 lb bag)
Quick Facts:
• Introduced in the early 19th century, coffee now heads the list of Costa Rica’s national exports.
• Our coffee comes from CooproNaranjo, a cooperative of coffee growers in the West Valley region.
• The founding of CooproNaranjo pre-dates the establishment of Costa Rica’s Agriculture Commission, and was an incentive in the forming of this ministerial body.
• Cooperative members have access to a shared wet mill and technical assistance from trained agronomists.
• CooproNarajo helps small farmers to obtain Rainforest Alliance certification and educates on sustainable practices.
• The cooperative encourages its members and the farming community in general to replace agrochemicals with more ecologically gentle vermicompost.

About our Coopro Naranjo coffee:
Coffee was introduced to Costa Rica in the early 19th century to satisfy Spanish colonizers who were accustomed to its flavor and energy-giving qualities, already widely enjoyed across Europe. The rich soils and warm, humid climate proved to be ideal for growing coffee, and soon it became the country’s principal export product. Two centuries later it still heads the list of national exports, and most of the country’s infrastructure has been financed by income from coffee production.

Founded in 1960, CooproNaranjo is a cooperative of coffee growers in the county of Naranjo. It’s early aims were to pool efforts for coffee processing, and purchase a shared mill. The cooperative has gone on to implement comprehensive measures to improve coffee quality and production. In addition to educating its members about sustainable farming practices and providing technical agricultural assistance, CooproNarajo helps small farmers to obtain Rainforest Alliance certification. The beans in our Naranjo blend come from four farms in the West Valley region that have obtained this certification.

It is interesting to note that the founding of CooproNaranjo pre-dates the establishment of Costa Rica’s Agriculture Commission, and was probably an incentive in the forming of this ministerial body, having set a precedent with its regular assembly of representatives and quasi-political structure. Since the early 1960’s, CooproNaranjo has grown from 94 to 2,500 members, has achieved international recognition as coffees have received Cup of Excellence awards, and has been recognized by the Costa Rican Chamber of Commerce for its important contribution to Costa Rican industry.

The cooperative has drafted legislation and regulations concerning coffee quality, environmental protection and occupational safety. It aims to increase the revenue for small farmers by boosting quality, and thus improve services and quality of life for its members. It offers free fertilizer transport to farmers, and encourages its members to observe more sustainable production methods, and to replace agrochemicals with less harmful vermicompost. Native species are used for shade trees, and production is balanced with protecting and improving water and soil.

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