Ethiopian Amaro Gayo

Ethiopian Amaro Gayo

Country: Ethiopia
Region: Amaro
Altitude: 5200 feet
Varietal: Heirloom Ethiopian Arabica
Process: Natural
$13.00 (12 oz can)
$75.00 (5 lb bag)
About our Ethiopian Amaro Gayo:
• Amaro Gayo is exported through Ethiopia’s only female miller/exporter, Asnakech Thomas.
• Thomas employs 32 full-time workers and another 200 seasonal workers at her site, located in the Amaro Mountains.
• All harvesting, sorting, and milling is done on site, giving Thomas full control over her crops.
• Thomas’ long-term ambition is to fund a hospital for the region of Amaro, eliminating the need for residents to travel over 100 kilometers (60 miles) to the one in Dilla.

About our Ethiopian Amaro Gayo:
The Amaro Mountains are a small range separating the communities of Amaro on the eastern slopes from Nechisar National Park and the lowland tribal areas of Arba Minch in southwest Ethiopia. Native to the region, Asnakech Thomas returned to Ethiopia in 2005 to focus on improving coffee quality and living conditions for the community. She became Ethiopia’s only female miller/exporter, employing 32 full-time workers and another 200 seasonal workers. All harvesting, sorting, and milling is done on site, giving her full control over her crops.

Local growers bring their freshly picked cherries to the Amaro Gayo processing station, where Thomas is known for being very discriminating in selecting which cherries she will agree to take. Chosen beans are dried on raised beds, preferable because they allow no contact with the soil and they provide even aeration, allowing air
to reach the bean from both above and below the beds.

Different from a washed Ethiopian coffee, the Amaro Gayo natural packs a powerful combination of blackberry/blueberry flavors on top of the traditional citrus/grapefruit acidic notes usually found in that region’s beans.

Thomas plans to use portions of her coffee earnings to improve the local health care options in Amaro. “My ambition for Amaro is that a hospital can be established there, specially to help mothers-to-be and their young children instead of them having to travel to the large town of Dilla more than 116 kilometers (72 miles) away. Often these women never return because birth accidents happen along the way; this indeed happened to my elder sister Zawditu and her baby,” Thomas states. They remain highly distinct from one another, with wild indigenous plants still found in the forests of the West.

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